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Training and Capacity Building

 

Training and capacity building efforts were at the heart of the BACP portfolio; they were the main mechanism by which grantees were able to remove policy barriers, reduce information gaps, support better production practices, and increase awareness of the importance of biodiversity for sustainable commodity production.

 

In cocoa, BACP sought to refine the definition of biodiversity-friendly production. In soy, BACP sought to build the evidence base for the importance of such practices. In palm oil, BACP looked to increase awareness of the HCV concept to producers.

 

Over the course of Phase 1, BACP grantees conducted 511 trainings and workshops with 19,140 participants. These activities targeted producers of all sizes, as well as national and district government officials. They frequently emphasized high conservation values and best management practices (BMP). Trainings were often associated with achieving a certification standard, but allowed producers, particularly smallholders, to benefit from improved management practices, even when certification was not achieved.

 

Virtually all of the trainings and workshops were part of a feedback loop resulting in (or taking place as a result of) the production of toolkits, methodologies, guides and manuals. Products included biodiversity assessment methodologies, HCV monitoring guides, and BMP toolkits. Overall, grantees produced 14 training modules that have been piloted and operationalized and are ready to be taken up by producers, civil society, policymakers, rural advisors, auditors, and other relevant stakeholders. Many of these toolkits are on platforms designed to support stakeholders who seek to scale and replicate and some require further steps to ensure dissemination is wider.

 

The creation and dissemination of these materials worked to influence stakeholders to move towards biodiversity-friendly production, and towards the removal of barriers to such production.

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